Lesley Bamberger

Lesley Bamberger

Photography by Martien Mulder

Lesley Bamberger

Lesley Bamberger (1965) has been working for the Kroonenberg Groep since 1986 and has headed the award-winning Dutch company – one of the largest real estate investors and developers in the Netherlands – since 1996.


"We are an investor who develops rather than a developer who invests. That's what makes us unique" says Bamberger. "Exceptional quality combined with an eye for detail is in our genes", continues Bamberger. "That's something that's typically Dutch. And that's what we brought with us across the Atlantic to New York. Our dedication to quality is where the Kroonenberg Groep makes a difference. Furthermore, our projects also bring added value to the area around them."

www.kroonenberg.nl

The Bank

Formerly the head office of ABN AMRO bank, this ten-story, 400,000 square foot building in the historic center of Amsterdam is an icon of inspiration, motivation, and innovation. Companies including Booking.com, BNP Paribas, Guerilla Games, George Deli USA, Marqt, Starbucks, Wagamama, and Vapiano occupy the beautiful spaces of this building, which has earned an A+ energy rating. Simply put: The Bank is a proven success. Rented to capacity – at the highest price per square meter in the Netherlands, the 'city within a city' is bursting with activity. For creating such a striking building with international allure, the Kroonenberg Groep were awarded the most prestigious Dutch real estate prize in 2012.

Résidence L'Étoile

Résidence L’Étoile, located in an upmarket area of Amsterdam – near both the World Trade Center and Schiphol International Airport – was developed by the Kroonenberg Groep into one of the most luxurious high-rise rentals in the Netherlands. Home to 40 residences – each occupying approximately 2,000 square feet – it features a beautifully designed lobby, staffed 24 hours a day by a porter or hostess; luxury guest accommodations; a fitness area – fully equipped with state-of-the-art equipment; and a wellness center with provisions for a wide range of professional services, including skin care treatments, massages, body wraps, and physiotherapy.

The Curve

This unique project was constructed in the rapidly emerging waterfront area of Amsterdam Noord (North). Designed by Dutch architect Ed Veenendaal, this oval-shaped glass office building was constructed using sustainable technology and materials. It includes nearly 20,000 square feet of triple-glazed glass with excellent sound insulation and soil-based thermal energy storage for cooling and heating purposes.

Piet Oudolf

Piet Oudolf

Photography by Martien Mulder

Piet Oudolf

Born in the city of Haarlem in the Netherlands, Piet Oudolf (1944) is arguably the world’s most influential contemporary landscape designer.

Renowned as the leading exponent of the New Perennials movement, rooted in a reverence for ‘wild nature’, Oudolf uses simple wild grasses to extraordinary effect, evoking hazy, dreamlike urban landscapes. In New York, he’s best known for his planting design for the elevated High Line in Chelsea Manhattan and the Gardens of Remembrance in Battery Park. For Huys, Oudolf has designed the landscaping for the rooftop terrace. "It's fantastic to be part of a Dutch project of this caliber, " he says.

www.oudolf.com

The High Line

A symbol and catalyst for gentrification, New York’s now-iconic High Line is a public park built on an obsolete elevated railway line that runs for 1.5 miles, 30 feet above the streets of Manhattan’s West Side. Piet Oudolf, created the design using a meticulous but as-nature-would-have-it planting algorithm that runs the gamut from grasslands to trees and shrubs, back to grass, and then to woodlands. Oudolf also further embraced nature by using a large percentage of plant species that were already growing on the derelict railway, after seeds were carried there by birds or the wind.

The Battery

Encompassing 25 acres of waterfront parkland, The Battery is the largest public open space in downtown Manhattan and located at the southernmost tip, where the Dutch first set foot on the island 404 years ago. In 2002, Piet Oudolf was commissioned by The Battery Conservancy to create a horticultural master plan for the park. The first phase of Oudolf’s horticultural design was the 10,000 square feet of the Gardens of Remembrance, a memorial to those who survived the September 11 attacks of 2001. The second phase was the four-acre Battery Bosque featuring 60,000 square feet of new perennial gardens. The third and final phase for Oudolf is the Battery Garden Bikeway, which will link the Hudson River Park Bikeway and the East River Esplanade, due to be completed this year.

Frank Sciame

Frank Sciame

Photography by Martien Mulder

Frank Sciame

‘A builder with the vision of an architect and the eye of a contractor’ best describes Frank J Sciame (1951), CEO and founder of the eponymous F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc. (Sciame).

Sciame enjoys its position as New York’s elite builder, entrusted with some of the metropolitan area’s most notable projects. ‘Where building is an art’ is the now-famous trademark of Sciame. It is this distinction, combined with an honest, fair and ethical approach to business, that has made Sciame the builder of choice for complexly designed and technically sophisticated projects.

www.sciame.com

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

In 2005, detailed monitoring of the exterior of the iconic 1959 Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building revealed cracks. Sciame was asked to take on the formidable task of fully restoring the complex geometry of its approximately 80,000 square feet of concrete walls, to ensure the building’s long-term health. Furthermore, the work had to be accomplished while the museum remained open to the public. This turned out to be the major construction challenge, and careful planning was required to ensure the Museum’s gallery and office space could remain 100% operational throughout the duration of the project. Sciame's team closely coordinated all exterior – and some interior – work with the Museum team to ensure normal operations could continue. The project was completed in 2008.

The Mark Hotel

The Mark Hotel at 1000 Madison Avenue at 77th Street is a 180,000-square-foot landmark building originally constructed in 1927. In 2007, the new owners of the hotel enlisted Sciame, alongside SLCE Architects and the renowned interior designer Jacques Grange, to renovate the prestigious Upper East Side hotel. The task included the restoration of the existing brick and limestone façade and the renovation of all the interior floors. The ground floor was restored to house the new Mark Bar and Mark Restaurant – the fine-dining establishment of one of NYC’s pre-eminent chefs, the award-winning Jean-Georges Vongerichten – and the 2nd floor to house Salon Mark by Frederic Fekkai and a fitness center.

The Morgan Library & Museum

Sciame was responsible for the construction and extensive renovation of a 150,000-square-foot complex at 29 East 36th Street, including a new 75,000-square-foot multi-level structure that knitted three historic NYC landmark buildings together. The design, by architects Renzo Piano Building Workshop, included a vault and a 240-seat auditorium below ground level. Above ground, a steel and glass structure housed a new Madison Avenue entrance, a large central piazza, new gallery space, and a reading room. In addition, the intricate design called for the restoration and preservation of the existing library complex: this included the 1906 library designed by Charles McKim; the 1928 library annex, and an 1840’s brownstone mansion that once served as the Morgan family residence. As well as having to meet rigorous landmark regulations, Sciame had to devise innovative solutions to various challenges including establishing the new building’s foundation 50 feet below ground level. Work was completed in 2006.

Carlo Zaskorski

Carlo Zaskorski

Photography by Martien Mulder

Carlo Zaskorski

Award-winning architect Carlo Zaskorski (1950) of Zaskorski & Notaro Architects AIA LLP (ZNA) has been practicing architecture for more than 30 years. For his services, he has received a Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award of Excellence from the New York Landmarks Conservancy, and an Award of Merit from the American Institute of Architects.

Established by Zaskorski in 1979, the Manhattan-based ZNA has more than 30 years of extensive experience in the renovation and rehabilitation of existing buildings – exterior and interior – in the public and private sectors in the New York City area, encompassing New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The firm regularly collaborates with internationally recognized designers and has completed the renovation of several of the finest quality co-op and condo residences, including upscale residences in the Trump Tower at 725 Fifth Avenue and historic landmarks such as The Beresford at 211 Central Park West and The St. Urban at 285 Central Park West; and interiors of buildings designed by Emory Roth and Rosario Candela.

www.znarchs.com

The Rodin Studios

Named after sculptor Auguste Rodin, this French Renaissance-style building at 200 West 57th Street dates from 1916–17 and was designed by Cass Gilbert, the architect of the famed Woolworth Building and other urban icons. Originally built to provide studios and residences for professional artists, it was converted for commercial use in 1968. In 2005, inspections of the façade – performed by Zaskorski & Notaro Architects – revealed extensive damage to the 90-year-old building. Work included replacing the 700-section terra-cotta cornice (in keeping with the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission’s specifications), fabricating 10,000 perfectly matched bricks to replace the original bricks; and extensive restoration of the original plaster-coffered ceiling in the lobby and cast-iron canopies – including decorative bats, ravens, and grapevine motifs.

River Residence

This project in Riverside, Connecticut, consisted of a major house addition and renovation. The design of the addition transformed a traditional colonial home into a postmodern residence. The addition – predominantly to the back of the house – consisted of a double-height octagonal family room, which opened onto the kitchen. The second level of the family room opened onto the second floor of the existing house, creating both brightness and an impression of grandeur. The location of the family room allowed it to be well integrated with the rest of the house’s entertaining rooms. A large master bedroom and bathroom suite was added, which included a private balcony and bay window.